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Malayalam language


Malayalam /mæləˈjɑːləm/ (മലയാളം, Malayāḷam [mɐləjaːɭəm]), is a language spoken in India, predominantly in the state of Kerala. It is one of the 22 scheduled languages of India and was designated a Classical Language in India in 2013.[5] Malayalam has official language status in the state of Kerala and in the union territories of Lakshadweep and Puducherry. It belongs to the Dravidian family of languages and is spoken by some 38 million people. Malayalam is also spoken in the neighboring states of Tamil Nadu and Karnataka; with more populace in the Nilgiris, Kanyakumari and Coimbatore districts of Tamil Nadu, and the Dakshina Kannada and Kodagu districts of Karnataka. Evolution The Tamil Chera Dynasty of Kerala came to an end in Kerala in 1102. Kerala was the integral part of the Pandyan Kingdomand Tamil was the state language of Kerala until 1310. After the fall of Villavar Tamils in 1310 after the attack of Delhi Sultanate under Malik Kafur Kerala was dominated by Tulu-Nepalese people who were migrants from Ahichatra who usedSanskrit and Prakrit. Many subcastes of Tulu Bunt such as Nayara, Menava, Kuruba and Samantha appeared in Kerala.Samanthas became the Kings of this Matriarchal society.This led to the decline of Tamil in Kerala. Still the Indigenous language of Kerala Malayanma otherwise called Malayalam or Malayalam-Tamil or Malayala Thamozhi orLingua Malabar Tamul continued to be used until 1820. History Malayalam is spoken mostly in the state of Kerala and adjoining areas. As "Mala" (Chera) means "mountain", the word "Malayalam" obviously refers to either people or the language of the mountainous region. Rama-charitam, which was composed in the 14th century A.D., may be said to have inaugurated Malayalam literature just as Naniah's Mahabharatam did for Telugu Dialects Dialects of Malayalam are distinguishable at regional and social levels,[42] including occupational and also communal differences. The salient features of many varieties of tribal speech (e.g., the speech of Muthuvans, Malayarayas, Malai Ulladas, Kanikkars, Kadars, Paliyars, Kurumas, and Vedas) and those of the various dialects of Dalits (a.k.a. "Harijans"),Brahmins, Nairs, Ezhavas, Syrian Christians (Nasrani), Latin Christians, Muslims, fishermen and many of the occupational terms common to different sections of Malayalees have been identified.